History Day

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Ohio History Day – Region 3 Competition | March 4, 2017


Registration forms and fees due | Wednesday, February 1

Papers, websites, and documentary previews due | Tuesday, February 14


History Day Resources

For Teachers | Rule Book | Middle School Guide | High School Guide

For Students | Topic Ideas | Choose a Project Category | National History Day Student Resources

For Judges | What to Expect When Judging | Categories | Rule Book | Sample Evaluation Forms


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National History Day is a model of multidisciplinary, project-based learning that frames the academic year. Students will sharpen skills in research methods, critical thinking, and synthesis of information from diverse sources. The process of project creation and competition is both highly demanding and highly rewarding for students and teachers.  Each year students explore a historical topic related to the annual theme and present their research through research papers, documentaries, exhibits, dramatic performances, or websites. In addition, students must be able to effectively present their findings and interpretations of their topics to a panel of judges. They must also be able to answer questions from the judges about the content of their project, as well as their research process. Successful entries proceed from the regional competition to the state competition in Columbus and the national competition in Washington D.C. A national evaluation of the National History Day program conducted in 2009-2010 revealed that teachers and students who participate in National History Day report stronger reading and research skills, better college and career readiness, and an overall increased interest in historical topics.

Each year, the Cleveland History Center and Case Western Reserve University are proud to co-host Ohio History Day’s Region 3 Competition.


About History Day 2017

 

2017 NHD Theme: Taking a Stand

Ohio Region 3: Cuyahoga, Lake, Lorain, Medina and Summit

Prizes: Compete for Cash (regional competition) and Scholarships (national competition)

 

Divisions

Middle School Students, grades 6-8, compete in the Junior Division

High School Students, grades 9-12, compete in the Senior Division

Entries 

Competition Registration

Opens: January 2017

Deadline: February 1, 2017

Fee: $8 per student

For more information, click here.

Research

Cleveland History Center Library

To book a research trip, contact 216-721-5722, extension 1502 or email education@wrhs.org.

Western Reserve Historical Society Digital Portal 

Encyclopedia of Cleveland History 

Cleveland Memory Project 

National Archives 

Competition Day | March 4, 2017

  • Museum Admission is free for all
  • Food Truck on site for breakfast and lunch
  • New! University Circle Scavenger Hunt Competition
  • Ohio Region 3 History Day Awards Ceremony to be held at the Cleveland Museum of Art

NEW! Competition Day Check-in

7:30am – 9:00am: Set-up and Contestant Check-in

Cleveland History Center | Exhibits

ALERT! All other entries must arrive 1 hour prior to judging time to check-in

Cleveland History Center | Websites & Papers

Case Western Reserve University | Documentaries & Performances


 Take a look back at winners from past years:

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

For general History Day inquiries, please contact:

Steve Eigsti, Region 3 History Day Associate  
Cleveland History Center
10825 East Boulevard
Cleveland, Ohio 44106
Email: historyday@wrhs.org
Phone: (216) 721-5722 ext. 1503
Fax: (216) 721-0891
Lori Smith, Region 3 History Day Coordinator
Cleveland History Center
10825 East Boulevard
Cleveland, Ohio 44106
Email: lsmith@wrhs.org
Phone: (216) 721-5722 ext. 1400
Fax: (216) 721-0891

 

National History Day is a meaningful way for students to study historical issues, ideas, people and events by engaging in historical research. When studying history through historical research, students and teachers practice critical inquiry: asking questions of significance, time and place. Through careful questioning history students are immersed in a detective story too engaging to stop reading.

– Excerpt From National History Day 2011