History on Tap | Euclid Beach Park

History on Tap | Euclid Beach Park

Join us on July 29 as we celebrate Euclid Beach Park with our History on Tap after-hours series. Enjoy special pop-up exhibits, food and drinks, and unlimited rides on the Euclid Beach Park Grand Carousel as you explore our museum galleries to learn more about the history of this beloved amusement park. Whether you want to relive your memories of the park or make new ones with your friends and family, this evening promises summer fun that you will never forget!

Including:

Behind-the-scenes demonstrations

Pop-up exhibits

Cash bar

Unlimited rides on the Euclid Beach Park Grand Carousel

Access to all Cleveland History Center museum galleries

And more!

This program is included with your museum admission. To purchase tickets, please click here.

Speaking of Cleveland Talk & Tour | The Apollo Program

Speaking of Cleveland Talk & Tour | The Apollo Program

Between 1969 and 1972, twenty-one American astronauts left Earth’s orbit and voyaged to the moon as part of NASA’s Apollo Program. Twelve of those men walked on the lunar surface. Join Chief Curator Eric Rivet to discover the triumphs and tragedies of the Apollo Program and learn about the men and machines that made it possible for us to leave Earth. Then, take a tour of the Cleveland History Center’s core exhibit, Cleveland Starts Here, to see the artifacts that inspired this program.

This tour is available virtually through Zoom AND in-person at the Cleveland History Center.

Registration

Price: This tour is included with the cost of museum admission. (General Admission: $12 / WRHS Members: Free)

In-Person Tour: To purchase your tickets for the in-person tour, click here. You will be redirected to our ticketing website, where you may purchase admission for the day of the tour.

Virtual Tour: To register for the virtual version of the tour, use the options below. The virtual program will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and all necessary login information.

History on Tap: PRIDE

History on Tap: PRIDE

In celebration of Pride Month, the Cleveland History Center is shining the spotlight on Cleveland’s LGBTQ+ history with History on Tap: PRIDE. Join us at the Cleveland History Center on June 24 for a historic happy hour celebrating Cleveland’s LGBTQ+ community, from its origins to the modern day.

The event will open with a brief presentation from our Cleveland history experts, followed by a networking opportunity designed to connect participants with the LGBTQ+ organizations within the community. Then, join us in the garden of our Bingham-Hanna Mansion to enjoy live music by the Dane Vannatter Trio, and explore our museum galleries, including our newest exhibit, Women & Politics, to learn about the LGBTQ+ trailblazers represented in the WRHS collection. A cash bar will be available (beer and wine only), and light refreshments will be offered for purchase.

Schedule of Events

5:30-5:45pm | PRESENTATION: Lucius and Chuck – Visible “Partners”?

Presenter: Dr. John Grabowski, Krieger Mueller Chief Historian

From the 1930s to the 1960s, Lucius Morris Beebe was an American celebrity.  Born into wealth, he became a syndicated columnist, author, gourmet, and ostentatious boulevardier who chronicled Café Society, the American West, and, most famously, railroads. But Beebe was also a member of America’s rather open wealthy gay society. He and his partner, Charles Clegg, lived, loved, and worked together for twenty-six years.  Their relationship ended only with Beebe’s death.

This presentation focuses on the story of “Luke” and “Chuck” but also explores the wider upper class gay society in which they lived – an interconnected community that included Cole Porter, Monty Wooley, and, importantly, several Clevelanders, including Jerome Zerbe, Leonard Hanna, Jr., and Winsor French.

5:45-6:00pm | PRESENTATION: Cleveland is So Gay!

Presenter: Ken Schneck, author of LGBTQ Cleveland and editor of The Buckeye Flame

Cleveland’s LGBTQ+ history exhibits the classic components of a Hollywood blockbuster: heroes, villains, epic crowd scenes, meet-cutes, and a soundtrack to end all soundtracks. We’ll take a quick tour through some images ranging from inspiring 19-year-olds to nefarious state senators to how a blade of grass almost caused the arrest of a cadre of protestors. And we’ll learn a heck of a lot about our LGBTQ+ Pride in the process!

6:00-6:30pm | Networking

Organizations Present: Plexus LGBT & Allied Chamber of Commerce; West 117 Foundation; The Buckeye Flame; PFLAG Cleveland; Western Reserve Historical Society LGBT Archives

6:30-8:00pm | Entertainment

Live music from the Dane Vannatter Trio

Cash bar

Museum galleries open

Pop-up exhibits

Admission

Event Admission: $25

WRHS Member Admission: $20

Includes admission to the Cleveland History Center as well as event admission.

To purchase your tickets, please click here.

Special Thanks to Our Partners

The Consequences of Cleaveland

by John Grabowski, PhD | WRHS Krieger Mueller Historian

On July 4th 1796, on the bank of what is now Conneaut Creek, a group of surveyors led by Moses Cleaveland celebrated Independence Day.  Naming the site Port Independence, they fired off a salute, ate a meal of pork and beans, and drank to six patriotic toasts.   Eighteen days later they arrived at the mouth of Cuyahoga River, climbing up a hill on the east bank (near what is now St. Clair Avenue) to the heights over the river valley.

The river marked the boundary of that part of the Western Reserve to which Native Americans had ceded their claims in the Greenville Treaty of 1795, and it seemed a likely area to begin the exploration and mapping out of the lands now “available” to settlement.  Yet it took several weeks for Moses Cleaveland to decide if the site would serve as the center for the survey party’s work, and what some might call the capital of the Western Reserve.  He made that decision in August.  It was the best possible choice and considered naming the settlement Cuyahoga, but his colleagues convinced him that it should take his name.

This is a quick and far too easy summary of the founding of Cleveland for it misses the broader impact of the event.   When Cleaveland’s surveying crew began to lay out the lines that would define the townships of the Western Reserve, they were imposing a change on the landscape that exceeded anything that had come before.

(Map of English Colonies Bordering on Ohio River 1754)

Moses Cleaveland did not come to an unsettled or unknown land.   The area had seen nearly ten thousand years of human habitation, some nomadic and some permanent.   The Native Americans who were the first settlers made only minor marks on a landscape that had been shaped by geology and time.  They created trails, riverside settlements, and burial mounds.   The mounds were already ancient by the time Cleaveland arrived, yet they signified a deeper history than that which some people commonly assume.

Nor was Cleaveland’s survey party the first “European” group to visit the general area.  Indeed existing maps and narratives helped lead Cleaveland to the site that would bear his name.   French and English trappers had been active in the area – meeting European demands for fur by working with the native population.  And, this activity would have an impact on the ecology of the region reducing species beyond their normal, usual “take.”   The French and British would also begin to map the area, placing their own lines on the landscape in order to claim ownership, and they would go to battle over the trans-Appalachian west and in doing so involve the natives as allies and combatants.  These alliances and new ones would echo in the backcountry beyond the colonies during the American Revolution.

That process was a lead up to what Cleaveland’s surveyors would do.  They would set in motion a more detailed survey and division that would forever transform the land – according to some, for the better, and for others, perhaps, for the worse.

Certainly the New England style town commons, now Public Square, that they laid out in their first maps, indicates their desire to recreate a community like those they knew in New England.  Yet, it is important to remember that Cleaveland was a member of and working for the Connecticut Land Company, what we would today call a “real estate” investment company.  Its interest was in dividing and assessing the land for settlement and profiting by its subsequent sale.  Neither Cleaveland nor most of the other investors had any interest in settling in the area. In many ways this process still resonates today when open land or existing structures are developed or re-developed by companies whose primary interest is in profit.

(Early Drawing of Downtown Cleveland by surveyor Seth Pease)

It would take time, but in the short space of two centuries, indeed, in a mere single century, the lines Cleaveland’s survey team drew on the map of Northeastern Ohio (the Connecticut Western Reserve) to make the land logically marketable would provide the basis for the transformation of a landscape that had seemed eternal to its first inhabitants – a landscape that was heavily wooded, with a number of open streams and creeks, and with abundant wildlife.    It is a landscape that we simply cannot fathom today, except in some parks and rare corners of northeastern Ohio.

It is a story of a transformation that is well chronicled in the archival collections of the Western Reserve Historical Society in documents that provide valuable insights into the settlement of northeastern Ohio and, in some instances, which also record the thoughts of those who saw the eternal slip away.

Perhaps one of most powerful of these documents is in a very small notebook, in which John M. Holley, a member of the Cleaveland survey team, wrote down the words spoken by Red Jacket, an orator of the Six Nations and a sachem of the Senecas at a council between Cleaveland’s party and Native Americans which took place at Buffalo, New York on June 23, 1796.  The meeting was in order to resolve the issue of remaining Native American claims to the Western Reserve.

“You white people make a great parade about religion, you say you have a book of laws and rules which was given you by the Great Spirit, but is this true? Was it written by his own hand and given to you? No, says he, it was written by your own people. They do it to deceive you. Their whole wishes center here (pointing to his pocket), all they want is the money. . . He says white people tell them, they wish to come and live among them as brothers, and learn them agriculture. So they bring on implements of husbandry and presents, tell them good stories, and all appears honest. But when they are gone all appears as a dream. Our land is taken from us, and still we don’t know how to farm it.”

Red Jacket, who had received a peace medal from President Washington in 1792 would gain great fame as an orator.  His lifetime (1750-1830) witnessed enormous change: wars, a revolution, and the division and loss of the lands he and his ancestors had known for ages.  His words and his story prompt us to think not only about our past, as we celebrate the founding of Cleveland in July, but also about our future and the role we continue to play in altering the natural landscape.

Common Ground | The Voice of the Vote: The Shared Power of Cleveland’s Voters

The Western Reserve Historical Society is proud to once again be a part of Common Ground, the Cleveland Foundation’s community-wide initiative to inspire connection, build community, and create positive change. This year, we will be exploring the theme of People, Place, and Shared Power through two of our exhibits at the Cleveland History Center, Women & Politics and Carl & Louis Stokes: Making History.

On June 5, join our experts as we dive into these exhibits to discover how citizens of Cleveland have exercised their power to effect change on individual, local, and national levels. After the tour, participants will break into groups to answer thought-provoking discussion questions based on the exhibits. Finally, the groups will come back together to share what they have learned and explore how the lessons of People, Place, and Shared Power can be used to make changes within their community.

Registration for this event is free but required. This event will be held both in-person at the Cleveland History Center and virtually through Zoom. Due to current COVID-19 restrictions, in-person tickets are limited, but there is no limit on virtual participants.

Speaking of Cleveland Talk & Tour | Euclid Beach Park

Speaking of Cleveland Talk & Tour | Euclid Beach Park

Euclid Beach Park holds special memories for Clevelanders of all ages. Just what makes this park so very memorable? Join John Frato, Euclid Beach Park Grand Carousel Training & Volunteer Coordinator, for this month’s Speaking of Cleveland Talk & Tour to find out!

First, learn about the story of Euclid Beach Park as we present our lecture, The Story of Euclid Beach Park. This presentation will cover the park’s history, from its beginnings in 1895 through its heyday and into its final days in 1969. Then, explore the iconic Euclid Beach Park Grand Carousel like never before in a behind-the-scenes tour of the carousel at the Cleveland History Center. Get up-close with the colorful, hand-carved wooden horses and hand-painted scenes on the carousel’s exterior and take a peek into its inner workings while learning the story of its restoration.

This tour is available virtually through Zoom AND in-person at the Cleveland History Center. Spaces for the in-person event are limited, so reserve your spot today!

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / WRHS members FREE

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform and live at the Cleveland History Center. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and all necessary login information.

Sales for in-person tickets will end at 12:30pm on the day of the event; tickets for the virtual experience will be available until the start of the event (6:00pm).

Virtual Panel Discussion | Slovenian Neighborhoods of Cleveland

Virtual Panel Discussion | Slovenian Neighborhoods of Cleveland

Virtual Panel Discussion | Slovenian Neighborhoods of Cleveland

Cleveland is home to the largest settlement of Slovenians outside of Europe. Slovenian-Americans took advantage of the resources the city made available to them to build families and institutions and develop a lively cultural scene. Each of the city’s Slovenian neighborhoods was anchored by an imposing cultural Hall or majestic church (or both), surrounded by tidy homes and thriving businesses. Many high-profile Clevelanders emerged from those neighborhoods to leave their mark on the city. Joe Valencic talks about these remarkable individuals, as well as why Slovenians chose Cleveland and what set each neighborhood apart. Dr. John Grabowski reviews the impact immigration had on the growth of the city and what this particular nationality contributed to the city.

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and all necessary login information.

Online Course Begins | Black Agency and Black Activism: Cleveland, Ohio, c. 1820-2020

Black Agency and Activism in Cleveland

WRHS Online Course | Black Agency and Black Activism: Cleveland, Ohio, c. 1820-2020

Course Description:

In recent decades, educators, journalists, authors, and elected officials have frequently joined others in struggling to understand citizens’ growing activism and public protests against police violence, inadequate health care, political disfranchisement, and violations of the economic and civil rights of Black citizens. Many of these same individuals have also enjoyed some measure of success in helping to address these concerns. While the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag and related Twitter feeds are relatively new, in Cleveland, Ohio the aforementioned struggles have a long and carefully documented history. This online course will provide participants with opportunities to consider the long view of Black Agency and Black Activism, from the Antebellum Era to the 21st Century (c. 1820 – 2020). Course activities will focus on the work of John Malvin, Charles W. Chesnutt, Mary Brown Martin, L. Pearl Mitchell, Carl Stokes, Sarah J. Harper, Black Lives Matter (Cleveland), leaders of area churches, and other groups and individuals.

This four-session course is designed to coincide with the 50th anniversary celebration of the African American Archives Auxiliary (“Quad A”) of the Western Reserve Historical Society. Master teachers and Quad A members Beverly Lloyd and Margaret Peacock have agreed to give brief presentations on Kwanzaa during the session focusing on Black Cultural Nationalism in the 1960s and 1970s. The list of suggested readings will include works by Samuel W. Black, Regennia N. Williams, Marvin A. McMickle, Todd Michney, A. Grace Lee Mims, Leonard Moore, Nishani Frazier, and other scholars and artists whose published works are based in part on materials in the African American Archives.

Note: Readings for this course are suggested but not required. This course will not involve any written assignments.

Schedule: Thursdays, April 29; May 6, 13, and 20

Time: 6:00-7:30pm (a brief break will be included)

Instructor: Regennia N. Williams, PhD, WRHS Distinguished Scholar of African American History and Culture; and other guest presenters.

Pricing:

Course Registration | $60

WRHS Member Registration | $50

How to Register:

To register, please see below. This course will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, your confirmation will include a link that will allow you to join the course, as well as all necessary login information and instructions.

Registration will close at 12:00pm on Thurs., April 29. If you need to sign up after registration closes, please email Whitney Stalnaker, Public Programs Manager, at wstalnaker@wrhs.org

 

Speaking of Cleveland | Stories from Millionaires’ Row

Speaking of Cleveland | Stories from Millionaires’ Row

The Cleveland History Center’s signature lecture series, Speaking of Cleveland, invites participants to take a front-row seat as our experts share significant stories that capture the Cleveland spirit. Each month, join our staff as we explore the intriguing, curious, and oft-forgotten tales from Cleveland’s past. Pulled directly from the nationally recognized collections of the Western Reserve Historical Society, these stories showcase the innovation, the grit and the pride that characterize Cleveland’s past, present and future.

This Month’s Program

Declared “the most beautiful street in America,” Euclid Avenue was once home to powerful families who not only shaped Cleveland, but national politics and industry, as well. Hear their stories as you take a walk down Euclid Avenue in the 19th Century and learn about the beautiful art and architecture of their homes.

Don’t miss our corresponding virtual tour of the Hay-McKinney Mansion on April 15! Register for both events below and save on your admission!

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

Speaking of Cleveland Combo Ticket (includes tour and lecture): $25 general admission / $15 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and all necessary login information.

Speaking of Cleveland Tour | Hay-McKinney Mansion

Speaking of Cleveland Tour | Hay-McKinney Mansion

The Cleveland History Center’s signature lecture series, Speaking of Cleveland, invites participants to take a front-row seat as our experts share significant stories that capture the Cleveland spirit. Each month, join our staff as we explore the intriguing, curious, and oft-forgotten tales from Cleveland’s past. Pulled directly from the nationally recognized collections of the Western Reserve Historical Society, these stories showcase the innovation, the grit and the pride that characterize Cleveland’s past, present and future.

This Month’s Program

The Hay-McKinney Mansion is 20,000 square foot, Italian Renaissance Revival home, located in the fashionable Wade Allotment. Only briefly inhabited, this living museum tells the stories of Mrs. Clara Hay, the McKinney family, and prominent Clevelanders who built a city through savvy entrepreneurship and generous philanthropy. The home is now furnished with period artifacts from the WRHS collections, each room laid out as it might have been in the late 18th and early 19th century. The mansion is a picture of a city’s rise and the men and women who shaped it.

This tour is available virtually through Zoom AND in-person at the Cleveland History Center. Spaces for the in-person tour are limited, so reserve your spot today!

Don’t miss our corresponding virtual lecture, Stories from Millionaires’ Row, on April 21! Register for both events below and save on your admission!

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

Speaking of Cleveland Combo Ticket (includes tour and lecture): $25 general admission / $15 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform and live at the Cleveland History Center. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and, if applicable, instructions on how to join via Zoom.

Online Course Begins | Whose History Gets Saved?

whose history gets saved graphic

WRHS Online Course | Whose History Gets Saved?

Course Description:

Our knowledge of the past, of history, depends on a number of things, including the historians, authors, filmmakers, and museum staff who create a narrative about a person, a time, a place, or an event. But ultimately those narratives rest on the evidence available to them – among them, documents, objects, oral histories, and increasingly digitized data. This three-week online class will focus on those sources and raise a number of questions as to how they survive and come to be used.

It is not a simple story, but one resting on the ability to create a source, the serendipity of its survival, the biases and viewpoints that lead to its preservation, and the manner in which individuals choose to interpret it. This is not a simple story, but one that raises many questions: questions about authority, intent, capacity, politics, funding, and changing viewpoints about the past. This course will be both lecture and discussion – indeed, discussion will be critical to debating and understanding how we come to know history.

Note: Readings for this course are suggested but not required. This course will not involve any written assignments.

Schedule: Wednesdays, March 31; April 7 and 14

Time: 12:00-1:30pm (a brief break will be included)

Instructor: John Grabowski, PhD, Krieger Mueller Chief Historian

Pricing:

Course Registration | $60

WRHS Member Registration | $50

How to Register:

To register, please see below. This course will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, your confirmation will include a link that will allow you to join the course, as well as all necessary login information and instructions.

Virtual Presentation | Who Names the Neighborhood? A Question of Identity

Virtual Presentation | Who Names the Neighborhood? A Question of Identity

Presenter: John Grabowski, PhD, WRHS Senior Vice President, Research & Publications; Krieger Mueller Historian

About This Program

Cleveland’s neighborhoods have, and have had, an intriguing series of names – from Kamm’s Corners to Dutch Hill and Little Italy and now to Hingetown. Some names have been around for over a century, others are new. Neighborhood identity is something many take for granted, yet the story of names and name changes for areas within the city opens a deeper story. Who, for instance, gets to choose the name – the people who live in the area, or city officialdom? Why, when and how have the identities of neighborhoods been altered simply the ascription of a new name? When did the original “organic” borders of neighborhoods become straight lines on a map? This session will explore the history of Cleveland’s neighborhoods by looking at the broader story of their identities over time and the manner in which name changes have been influenced both by shifting demography, politicians, developers, and urban planners.

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and all necessary login information.

Speaking of Cleveland | Battle for the Ballot: Cleveland’s Suffragist Movement

Cleveland's Suffrage Movement

Speaking of Cleveland | Battle for the Ballot: Cleveland’s Suffragist Movement

The Cleveland History Center’s signature lecture series, Speaking of Cleveland, invites participants to take a front-row seat as our experts share significant stories that capture the Cleveland spirit. Each month, join our staff as we explore the intriguing, curious, and oft-forgotten tales from Cleveland’s past. Pulled directly from the nationally recognized collections of the Western Reserve Historical Society, these stories showcase the innovation, the grit and the pride that characterize Cleveland’s past, present and future.

This Month’s Program

There is no complete record of the brave, often unnamed women who fought for their right to vote and finally triumphed in 1920. Learn about a band of women who dedicated themselves to the public interest and grew into an organization that won the respect and confidence of the nation. This program will tell the story behind the Cleveland women who advocated for suffrage and went on to help establish the League of Women Voters.

Don’t miss our corresponding virtual tour of our newest exhibit, Women & Politics, on March 10! Register for both events below and save on your admission!

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

Speaking of Cleveland Combo Ticket (includes tour and lecture): $25 general admission / $15 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and all necessary login information.

Speaking of Cleveland Virtual Tour | Women & Politics

Women and Politics

Speaking of Cleveland Virtual Tour | Women & Politics

The Cleveland History Center’s signature lecture series, Speaking of Cleveland, invites participants to take a front-row seat as our experts share significant stories that capture the Cleveland spirit. Each month, join our staff as we explore the intriguing, curious, and oft-forgotten tales from Cleveland’s past. Pulled directly from the nationally recognized collections of the Western Reserve Historical Society, these stories showcase the innovation, the grit and the pride that characterize Cleveland’s past, present and future.

This Month’s Tour

Presented by PNC and WRHS in collaboration with the League of Women Voters of Greater Cleveland, Women and Politics is a virtual exhibit that traces the story of women’s empowerment, explores the early days of the suffragist movement, examines the successful fight for the 19th Amendment, and celebrates the birth and growth of the League of Women Voters as a force for clean government and the election of northern Ohio women to positions of power.

Don’t miss our corresponding virtual lecture, Battle for the Ballot: Cleveland’s Suffragist Movement, on March 17! Register for both events below and save on your admission!

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

Speaking of Cleveland Combo Ticket (includes tour and lecture): $25 general admission / $15 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and all necessary login information.

Speaking of Cleveland | Praying Grounds: African American Faith Communities

Speaking of Cleveland | Praying Grounds: African American Faith Communities

The Cleveland History Center’s signature lecture series, Speaking of Cleveland, invites participants to take a front-row seat as our experts share significant stories that capture the Cleveland spirit. Each month, join our staff as we explore the intriguing, curious, and oft-forgotten tales from Cleveland’s past. Pulled directly from the nationally recognized collections of the Western Reserve Historical Society, these stories showcase the innovation, the grit and the pride that characterize Cleveland’s past, present and future.

This Month’s Program

African American faith communities have long served as influential centers of social and religious activities. In this presentation, historian and author Regennia N. Williams will discuss the evolving role of religion in Black America, based on her ongoing research for the Praying Grounds Oral History Project and her books and other publications, including Cleveland, Ohio and “Race, Religion, and Reconciliation: Academic Initiatives, Leadership Development, and Social Change.”

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and all necessary login information.

Speaking of Cleveland | The History of Hough Bakery

Speaking of Cleveland | The History of Hough Bakery

The Cleveland History Center’s signature lecture series, Speaking of Cleveland, invites participants to take a front-row seat as our experts share significant stories that capture the Cleveland spirit. Each month, join our staff as we explore the intriguing, curious, and oft-forgotten tales from Cleveland’s past. Pulled directly from the nationally recognized collections of the Western Reserve Historical Society, these stories showcase the innovation, the grit and the pride that characterize Cleveland’s past, present and future.

This Month’s Program

This program traces the history of Hough Bakery, a beloved local business, from its founding in 1903 to its momentous closure in 1992.  With photographs and materials from the Hough Bakery archives held by WRHS, explore the growth and expansion of the company in the mid-twentieth century, and remember the magnificent products the bakery produced that live on today in the treasured memories of Clevelanders.

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation containing your purchase receipt and all necessary login information.

Speaking of Cleveland | Italian American Life in Cleveland

Speaking of Cleveland | Italian American Life in Cleveland

The Cleveland History Center’s signature lecture series, Speaking of Cleveland, invites participants to take a front-row seat as our experts share significant stories that capture the Cleveland spirit. Each month, join our staff as we explore the intriguing, curious, and oft-forgotten tales from Cleveland’s past. Pulled directly from the nationally recognized collections of the Western Reserve Historical Society, these stories showcase the innovation, the grit and the pride that characterize Cleveland’s past, present and future.

This Month’s Program

Today, Cleveland is home to a vibrant Italian American community that has grown over decades of immigration. Explore Italian immigration to the city from the late 19th Century through the present day, with a focus on life in the Italian neighborhoods.

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, we will email you a link that will allow you to join the course, as well as all necessary login information and instructions.

Speaking of Cleveland | Ghosts of Christmas Past

Speaking of Cleveland | Ghosts of Christmas Past

The Cleveland History Center’s signature lecture series, Speaking of Cleveland, invites participants to take a front-row seat as our experts share significant stories that capture the Cleveland spirit. Each month, join our staff as we explore the intriguing, curious, and oft-forgotten tales from Cleveland’s past. Pulled directly from the nationally recognized collections of the Western Reserve Historical Society, these stories showcase the innovation, the grit and the pride that characterize Cleveland’s past, present and future.

This Month’s Program

Enjoy a true Victorian holiday season and explore the ghosts and folklore that shaped 19th Century holidays in Cleveland. Whether you view them as creepy superstitions or tales with hidden wisdom, these stories are made to entertain and will leave you looking at holiday traditions in a whole new way.

Registration

Price: $15 general admission / $10 WRHS member admission

You may register using the options below. This event will be held through the Zoom platform. When you register, we will email you a link that will allow you to join the course, as well as all necessary login information and instructions.

Cleveland Civics History Series | Women & Philanthropy: The Monied Women of Cleveland and Their Impact

Women and Philanthropy: The Monied Women of Cleveland and Their Impact

Presenter: Dr. Einav Rabinovitch-Fox, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of History, Case Western Reserve University

Date: Thursday, December 3

Time: 7:00 pm

About the Event: This talk will examine the role of the Wade family women and their milieu in shaping the culture of philanthropy and the Settlement Movement in late nineteenth century Cleveland.

The Cleveland Civics History Series is sponsored by the Cleveland History Center, Siegal Lifelong Learning Program at Case Western Reserve University, and the League of Women Voters – Greater Cleveland.

Cleveland Civics History Series | The City on the Hill: Tom L. Johnson and the Mayors Influenced by Henry George

The City on the Hill: Tom L. Johnson and the Mayors Influenced by Henry George

Presenter: Dr. Alexandra W. Lough, author of The Last Tax: Henry George and the Social Politics of Land Reform in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Date: Thursday, November 19

Time: 7:00 pm

About the Event:Cleveland during the period of Mayor Tom L. Johnson (1901-1909) was considered by many to be one of the best governed cities in the nation. But Johnson was just one of several mayors who were followers of the 19th century political economist and social reformer Henry George. Dr. Alexandra Lough will explain how the teachings of Henry George influenced Tom L. Johnson’s mayoralty in Cleveland.

The Cleveland Civics History Series is sponsored by the Cleveland History Center, Siegal Lifelong Learning Program at Case Western Reserve University, and the League of Women Voters – Greater Cleveland.